Glass Animals

DSP Shows

Glass Animals

Little Dragon, Combo Chimbita

Sat · July 29, 2017

Doors: 5:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm

$40 Advance

This event is all ages

Glass Animals has partnered with PLUS1 so that $1 from every ticket sold goes to helping millions of young people through Crisis Text Line http://www.crisistextline.org/

Glass Animals
Glass Animals
It's less than 48 hours after frontman Dave Bayley has applied the finishing touches to Glass Animals' second album and he's contemplating where he and his bandmates found themselves only two years ago. "It's mad, we were in our friend's basement playing to four people," he laughs.

Fast forward to six months ago and they were rounding off a tour that catapulted Dave and bandmates Drew MacFarlane (guitar), Edmund Irwin-Singer (bass) and Joe Seward (Drums) around the world and back; climaxing in sold-out shows at The Wiltern in LA and Terminal 5 in New York, via huge festival slots in Australia, the US and - of course - Glastonbury.

Have they been able to gain any perspective on all this worldwide success? "I don't know if I have!" Dave wonders. "It's such a strange position to be in. I always thought Glass Animals would just be a fun thing to do with my friends. To be able to do it as a career is totally mental. I haven't had time to think about it. I'd probably go crazy if I did." Indeed, given the successes, Glass Animals would be ripe for the cliched 'difficult second album' experience. Every tour has sold out, they've hit 200 million streams and debut album 'Zaba' shifted over 500,000 records. For a band on a label backed by legendary producer Paul Epworth no less - the pressure to up the ante had potential crippling side-effects.

Dave doesn't bat an eyelid when it comes to the mention of the sophomore slump phenomenon at all, though. He simply didn't have time to get himself in a pickle. Instead, only six months after getting off the road he's already plotting what the stage sets are going to look like, how the artwork will take shape, and so on.

The new LP - titled 'How To Be A Human Being' - has come together so fast you'd assume they wrote it on the road. "No! We didn't have time," says Dave. "It happened as soon as we came off the tourbus." Before his suitcase was even on the ground, Dave was setting up shop in their small studio space in Hornsey, North London by himself.

Writing the skeleton of the album in a week and a half over Christmas, he was desperate to put the experiences of the last two years onto paper before he forgot them. "I had the most successful time I've ever had writing," he says humbly. "I had all of these stories in my head."

Mapping out the skeletons of the songs proved to be an entirely different process from that taken on 'Zaba'. "Last time, I started with beats and electronic soundscapes, and this time I started mainly with chords, vocal lines... sometimes even lyrics. I tried to invert the whole process," he explains. The majority of the writing, sonics and production was taken care of in an intense 10-day period. Then in January, Dave began polish out the stories, lyrics, and music, perfecting the parts.​ He would send the bear bones of each song to the band. He would bring the demos to the band, and as a group they would develop the music further, experimenting with the arrangements and instrumentation.

As indicated by lead single 'Life Itself', the new sound is bigger, bolder and far more ambitious. Dave makes a point of not listening to his contemporaries when making music, preferring to look inwards to the world Glass Animals have built. In crafting this record, his thoughts returned to one factor he couldn't even dream of on 'Zaba' - the huge live audiences they'd been drawing. "You sense what the crowds react to: big drums, bass, high tempo."

As Glass Animals' live set evolved, so did their sonic aspirations. Dave himself is like an electro Einstein, forever pursuing his next lightbulb moment. "That instant when a melody pops into your head and you know that's the one, or you sit down at a piano, hit four strange chords in a row and think - ooh that works! There was a conscious effort to make this record harder, angular and in-your-face. I started appreciating rawness."

The band would use first takes, shabby recordings, and sounds that resonated with soul, despite their technical imperfections. Much of this proved to be a punk-like reaction to the high-polished nature of pop Dave was hearing on the radio. "I was paranoid that's what we sounded like," he says. "On the last record I had the opposite mentality. Everything had to be perfect. This is more gritty. We've shaken that mentality now."

'How To Be A Human Being' is about people. Many of his lyrical ideas came from live recordings of people saved on Dave's phone, as though he'd been operating as some sort of roaming journalist all this time. "I try to sneakily record people, and I have hours and hours of these amazing rants from taxi drivers, people we met outside of shows, people at parties. People say the strangest shit when they don't think they're ever gonna see you again...and sometimes they'll break your heart with the saddest, most touching stories." The voice notes sparked ideas for characters that Dave developed, writing an album like a TV screenwriter might approach a script. "I'd obsess over what they ate, where they lived, what their furniture looked like, what they wore," he laughs. "Some of it's quite autobiographical but said through the eyes of someone else."

Their fascination with the human condition is understandable given their relative isolation a few years ago. Back in Oxford, studying medicine at university, the thought of being a real-life viable band wasn't something that crossed their mind. They were living in a bubble. "We spent those years really isolated, just making our own noise. Then all of a sudden we crashed into this place where we were in a different city every day, meeting so many characters every day."

From the depths of 'Agnes' to the danceable humour of 'Life Itself', this second album is a zeitgeist-leaning, intrepid exploration into what makes us all tick, told from the viewpoint of four guys who have experienced life in its most extreme and unexpected form for the past two years. It doesn't just connect with your feet - it connects with your brain, your heart, your soul.

'How To Be A Human Being' is a multi-layered, nuanced album that uniquely splices together 40 years of sonic history in a way that's emphatically forward-sounding. In the characters and themes explored, the record creates a world for fans to inhabit. With every listen comes further insight, not just into Glass Animals' universe but the human condition itself.
Little Dragon
Little Dragon
"Nabuma Rubberband gamely wrestles with soul, R&B, and electronic music in a way that feels both rigorously road tested
and coolly self-possessed." - Interview Magazine
"[Nabuma Rubberband] is the kind of artistic leap every band hopes to make." - The Boston Globe
Gothenburg's Little Dragon has steadily grown from being the biggest underground secret to international acclaim after four successful albums and touring all over the world. Their energetic live set and unique recording process has made fans out of some of the biggest names in music including Pharrell Williams, Questlove, and OutKast. Gaining popularity among such tastemakers led to collaborations with artists like Big Boi, The Gorillaz, Future, and SBTRKT and more recently with Mac Miller, Kaytranada,Flume and De La Soul. The release of Little Dragon's fourth album, Nabuma Rubberband was a culminating moment in their career after years of building a grassroots fan-base. Musically inspired by the more experimental pockets of Prince's back catalogue, club culture and the vintage Janet Jackson slow jams Yukimi used to listen to wandering around Gothenburg during the unrelenting winter, Nabuma Rubberband has a different feel to previous Little Dragon albums. "When you put some of Janet's really slow stuff on you feel like you're floating," Yukimi explains. "That feeling really influenced me and maybe that's why there are quite a lot of slow jams on the record. In the past we've been a bit self-conscious about making slow jams after 'Twice'. Then we wanted to make dance music which we did with Machine Dreams and then Ritual Union still had a dance vibe, but with this album it wasn't about that. The intention was about whatever we felt strongly about." Yukimi Nagano, Erik Bodin, Fred Wallin and Håkan Wirenstrand make up Little Dragon, the zeitgeist band that blend strands of R&B, electronic and indie into beautifully and meaningfully crafted songs. Over the course of four critically-lauded albums, Little Dragon have established themselves as a band keen to never rest on their laurels - constantly prodding and playing with the boundaries of their sound. The bands fifth album is currently in the making and tentatively planned for 2017.
Combo Chimbita
Combo Chimbita
Rooted in Colombia and based in New York, Combo Chimbita lives in the future. After playing together for years, these first-generation New Yorkers—powerhouse vocalist Carolina Oliveros, synth and bassist Prince of Queens, guitarist Niño Lento, and drummer Dilemastronauta—began experimenting with different traditional musical styles during their late night residencies at Barbès in Brooklyn. Exploring the connections between visual identity and improvisational long-form trips, Combo Chimbita came together as a four-piece band after they started encouraging more vocals by Carolina Oliveros, who tightens the rhythm with her guacharaca. “Her voice is so powerful that it leads us in that direction,” says Prince of Queens. Their thunderous first EP, El Corredor del Jaguar, was released in October 2016 on Names You Can Trust and recorded in Combo Chimbita’s DIY studio, El Bunker.

Inspired by Sun Ra’s Afrofuturism, Combo Chimbita champions Tropical Futurism, “the idea that the future doesn’t necessarily have to be this super white Western high-tech Star Wars stuff; that the indigenous ideas and culture of people of color, people of Latin America, can also represent a magical and substantial future. It’s a vision that maybe a lot of people don’t necessarily think about often. The old and deep knowledge that indigenous people have of the land has been neglected for many years as part of capitalism and colonization.”

On the first day of summer, June 21, 2017, Figure & Ground releases Abya Yala, a full-length sonic journey through Tropical Futurism comprised of eight original tracks by Combo Chimbita. Produced by Lily Wen, the band recorded the album live in the same room downstairs at Shahzad Ismaily’s new studio in Brooklyn. Limited to 500 vinyl copies, the 12-inch LP release features a hand-drawn insert with the Abya Yala story and a download card. It is available for pre-order at fgrecords.com.
Venue Information:
Brewery Ommegang
656 Co Hwy 33
Cooperstown, NY, 13326
http://www.ommegang.com/