Ray LaMontagne with very special guest Neko Case

DSP Shows and Higher Ground

Ray LaMontagne with very special guest Neko Case

Neko Case

Wed · July 4, 2018

Doors: 5:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm

ADVANCED TICKETS: $55.00

This event is all ages

Ray LaMontagne
Ray LaMontagne
Ray LaMontagne will release his seventh studio album, Part Of The Light, on May 18th via RCA Records. The album was written and produced by Ray LaMontagne and will feature the first single, “Such A Simple Thing.”

Ray LaMontagne has released 6 studio albums, 5 of which have reached the Top 10 on Billboard’s Top Rock Albums chart and Billboard’s Digital Albums chart. Additionally, his 2010 album God Willin’ & the Creek Don’t Rise won the Grammy for Best Folk Album and was nominated in the coveted Song of The Year category for “Beg Steal or Borrow.”

Each release from his catalogue over the last 13 years carries its own character and feel. Having worked with producers Ethan Johns, Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys and Jim James of My Morning Jacket, Ray’s vast sonic catalogue has been called everything from “a perfect throwback to the lost art of the album-length format,” from Entertainment Weekly to “epic and magical,” from Rolling Stone and “gorgeous and ambitious,” from Esquire. NPR’s All Things Considered said that Ray throughout the course of his career “has continued to push himself in different directions,” while People called Ray a “marvel of nature.”
Neko Case
Neko Case
Five years have passed since Case's last solo project, The Worse Things Get, the Harder I Fight, the Harder I Fight, the More I Love You. In the interim, she sang on Whiteout Conditions, the 2017 release from longtime bandmates the New Pornographers. The year before that, she released a vinyl box set of her solo work and joined k.d. Lang and Laura Veirs on the case/lang/veirs project.

Recording that record was a revelation, from Veirs' innovative guitar tunings to Lang's skills in studio. "I learned so much experiencing the work ethic of those two," Case says. She considers Lang "probably the most natural producer I've ever seen. Watching her work was awe-inspiring."

After their national tour together, Case found similar transcendence in October 2016 sitting on a panel at the first-of-its-kind "Woman Producer" summit in Brooklyn, NY. Between discussions and performances from a diverse group of women who produce music from around the world, she wondered how it had taken such a long time to get to that moment, and why so many female pioneers had been forgotten.

She felt lucky to have worked with the people she had encountered across her career-Darryl Neudorf, Tucker Martine, Craig Schumacher, and Chris Schultz among them-who encouraged her to expand her own skills in studio. But she had also gotten fed up with a world in which women's accomplishments seemed to vanish from public memory. "The George Martins and Quincy Joneses of the recording pantheon deserve every drop of praise and every project they have received," Case says. "But we can't keep telling the same stories over and over. We need more stories, more inspiration, more flavors."

She set to work on her next record looking for not just new stories but also new sounds. This time, she wanted to put herself in a setting far away from everything she knew. She recalled Björn Yttling's skill with Lykke Li, Camera Obscura, and his own band, Peter Bjorn and John. "I've worked with the same people so long, I never had to step outside my comfort zone," Case says. "In this instance, I chose to."

The two met over breakfast in Washington, DC, and decided to team up. By the time she went to Sweden in the fall of 2017, Case had already written songs with longtime collaborator Paul Rigby, laid down vocal and guitar tracks at WaveLab Studio in Tucson, and built Carnacial Singing, her recording space in Vermont.

But in the middle of her stint in Stockholm, with the finish line in sight, she received a surreal 3am call telling her that her house was burning and would likely be completely destroyed. She felt panicked and helpless.

The fire had started in the barn, where she kept an assortment of belongings, from artwork to old pianos. A friend had managed to get the dogs to safety. After the flames jumped to the house, her home was engulfed, too.

A few hours later, she went into a studio in Stockholm and laid down the vocals for "Bad Luck," singing the lines she had written long before she realized they would land on her.

Case is now stoic about the fire. "If somebody burned your house down on purpose, you'd feel so violated. But when nature burns your house down, you can't take it personally." The month before the blaze, Hurricane Harvey had slammed into Texas and flooded Houston. Her home burned just as Puerto Rico was plunged into a nightmare by Hurricane Maria and wildfires incinerated California. "In the big picture, my house burning was so unimportant," she says. "So many people lost so much more: lives and lives and lives."

She was hell-bent on not losing sight of the goal, reminding herself there was still beauty in the world and in the process of making music. She had been reading a lot of ancient history, including Adrienne Mayor's The Amazons, and thinking about how for millennia, women have been more central to events than the average history class admits. "We were always there, we were just erased. And I knew it. As a little girl I knew it. As a young person I knew it," Case says. "Now I know it anew with a ferocious, righteous, razor-sharp tribe of witnesses, and it makes me feel like a super-powerful human being. It makes me feel joy. There's an inheritance there that's really important, and I want to share it."

She decided to climb inside her role as producer and wield it more directly. It just meant owning what she was already doing.
Venue Information:
Brewery Ommegang
656 Co Hwy 33
Cooperstown, NY, 13326
http://www.ommegang.com/