Henry Jamison

DSP Shows

Henry Jamison

Saint Sister

Sat · May 18, 2019

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Haunt

Ithaca, NY

$15.00

Tickets at the Door

Henry Jamison
Henry Jamison
In an era in which the magnitude of cultural sickness is coming to light, Henry Jamisonhas had some time to reflect. On his second record, Gloria Duplex, the Vermont songwriter deconstructs ideas of masculinity from boyhood to adulthood and what it meansto be a white, middle class male in America today. “All of the images that were coming to me were of boyhood or of manhood,” says Jamison. “It ended up that every song on the record is in some way addressing that subject.” It’s a lot to unpack.While an array of experiences fueled the themes behind Gloria Duplex, there were three in particular that made Jamison focus on the idea of coming-of-age. As a boy, he wanted to be a baseball player. “I had some desire to fall into that quarterback-cheerleader summer romance and that never happened for me,” Jamison says. He course-corrected from that archetype and attended the small liberal arts school Bowdoin College, where he grappled with being an artist in a sea of would-be businessmen. “My acquaintance said he literally got a hard-on when he thought of Goldman Sachs,” Jamison recalls. Jamison found himself avoiding classes and enacting his own form of resistance as an autodidact. Lastly, gaining perspective from his girlfriend and his own maturation prompted him to hone in on the theme of masculinity. “On my first record there are two songs where I tried to paint myself as that ‘heart of gold bro,’”he says. “I was charging around in my world in my oblivious ways, and then I got schooled by my girlfriend,” who’s spoken voice he samples throughout the record as a semi-subconscious feminine perspective (more on that later). In his reading of the psychologist James Hillman, Jamison discovered the term gloria duplex, a Renaissance maxim for keeping a consciousness of both sides, or “healing the split.” If men in his position are guilty of too much certainty, an idea such as gloria duplex could bring complexity back into a discourse in which it is sorely needed. “It’s as if we’re standing in front of a beautiful rainbow and only seeing blue,” he says. “We need to see the whole ROYGBIV.”With Gloria Duplex, he takes on his own shortcomings as well as those of the men around him, and they often appear to really be the same thing. Jamison’s flair for baroque pop and complex storytelling shines, as he blends intricate acoustic guitar and banjo with cinematic percussion and synthesizers. His baritone, Nick Drake-like voice tells vivid tales of boyhood and manhood, painting scenes intimately in the fashion of Sufjan Stevens. There’s a vulnerability in Jamison’s voice as he recounts memories and stories with such emotional candor, it’s impossible to tell the difference between what’s real and what’s not. But Gloria Duplexis utterly affecting, portraying the raw realities of what it’s like to come of age.On the album’s first single “Gloria,” Jamison reworks a melody from Irish folk ballad “Arthur McBride,” a song that recalls military recruiters trying to get two boys to join the service. It’s significant to Jamison, though, that perhaps the main danger to boys when the original ballad was written was that they’d be recruited into the military; today the dangers may be ultimately similar, but arise in subtler form “There’s a slow process by which men and boys recruit eachother into this very reductive sense of what it is to be a person,” he says. On “Boys,” Jamison sings about initiation rites and confronts the idea that boys in our culture don’t know how to
become proper men. “The thing is that I feel that way too and I really don’t have the answer,” he says. “Ether Garden” is a delicate, string-plucked lullaby, full of metaphor. And “American Babes” flaunts Jamison’s devastating talent for lyrical parole. But it’s the moments on the record where Jamison addresses the subject of masculinity with acute self-awareness that really stand out. “Was I looking up your skirt? Yeah of course I was,” a confessional and repentant Jamison sings on “True North” as casually as it happens to women every day on the subway. “Florence Nightingale” tackles his own misguided views of feminism that are a larger reflection of society. “I started going to acupuncture and this acupuncturist was this Florence Nightingale-like, very nurturing nurse character, and when I told my girlfriend that she thought it was terribly un-nuanced,” he says. “She asked why I couldn’t like strong, feminine power. So I corrected it to Mary Magdelene and included that correction in the song.” The song is Jamison’s self-proclaimed thesis statement, which chronicles his trying to get it right but getting it wrong anyway. Recorded over a two-week period in New York City during January 2018, Gloria Duplex features an all-star cast including producer Thomas Bartlett (Sufjan Stevens, The National, Yoko Ono, St. Vincent, Florence & The Machine) string arranger Rob Moose (Bon Iver, Arcade Fire, Laura Marling, Perfume Genius, Phoebe Bridgers) and mixer Patrick Dillett (Rhye, David Byrne, Glen Hansard).Jamison’s 2017 debut album The Wildshas over 80 million streams and earned support from The Guardian, NPR, KCRW, Billboard, Echoes, Consequence of Sound, WXPN, World Cafe's Artist To Watch and more. He has also toured with artists including Big Thief, Darlingside, Lady Lamb, Caroline Rose and Haux.
With his stunning debut album, 'The Wilds,' Jamison is ready to claim his place as the latest in a long line of remarkable storytellers. Blending delicate acoustic guitar and banjo with programmed percussion loops and synthesizers, the Vermont songwriter grapples with the jarring dissonances of contemporary life in his music as he struggles to reconcile the clashes between our inner and outer selves, the natural world and our fabricated society. Jamison is a solitary artist, writing, recording, and arranging everything himself on the album including the string arrangements, and he pens his lyrics with cinematic precision, conjuring vivid scenes and fully realized characters wrestling with existential crises and modern malaise. His dazzling way with words and keen ear for memorable hooks at once calls to mind the baroque pop of Sufjan Stevens and the unflinching emotional honesty of Frightened Rabbit, but the delivery is uniquely his own, understated yet devastating. Jamison is a solitary artist who writes, records, and arranges everything himself, including all of the album's gorgeous string arrangements, and 'The Wilds' is a pure reflection of the world through his eyes.

Recorded on a mountainside in Goshen, VT, during breaks in the maple sugaring season, 'The Wilds' comes on the heels of Jamison's 2016 breakout debut EP, 'The Rains.' Tracks from that collection racked up more than 20 million streams on Spotify, as his uniquely off-kilter brand of lyricism earned a swarm of critical acclaim. NPR's World Café featured Jamison in their breaking artist series, raving that his "descriptions of places ring true and his subtle production touches stand out," while Vice Noisey said his "mellow folk...soothes your nerves," and Consequence of Sound praised him as a "visual lyricist" writing music that "sounds like a dream taking form." The EP earned Jamison dates with Big Thief, Lady Lamb, and Tall Heights plus festival appearances and performances across Europe.
Saint Sister
Saint Sister
Saint Sister, formed in November 2014, is the creation of Morgan Macintyre and Gemma Doherty. The duo met while studying at Trinity College, Dublin and shortly after graduating they started making music together. A month after forming they were asked to perform on TG4 (Irish national TV), and opened Whelan’s for Arcade Fire’s Will
Butler. Their debut EP ‘Madrid’, recorded with Alex Ryan (bassist with Hozier), was released in November 2015 and has since reached 2 million streams on Spotify. The lead single was playlisted on RTE1 (Irish National radio) and was also championed by Huw Stephens and Phil Taggart, eventually being playlisted through the BBC introducing system on Radio 1 as well as on German national radio, 1Live.

2016’s ‘Tin Man’ came out on Communion’s Singles Club and received continued support from national radio, both at home and abroad. The track was nominated for song of the year by the Choice Music Prize and the band named Best Irish Band by the readers of the Irish Times. They performed this single for a televised performance in St James’ Church at Other Voices

The band’s 3rd release, ‘CausingTrouble’ was released in June 2017. The single also fared well at radio and was playlisted across Germany, Belgium and The Netherlands.

Since their formation, the band have toured extensively throughout Europe. They made their US debut in March 2016 with multiple showcases at SXSW and have had notable appearances at numerous festivals including BBC Introducing at Glastonbury, Latitude, Electric Picnic, Longitude, The Great Escape, Reeperbahn Festival and Eurosonic. In
2017 the band supported Lisa Hannigan on a 20 date European tour as well as a headline show at The National Concert Hall, Dublin. That September the band opened for The National in the Cork Opera house.
Venue Information:
The Haunt
702 Willow Ave
Ithaca, NY, 14850
http://thehaunt.com/